Tips for Reamping Electric Guitar for Room Sound

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Tips for Reamping Electric Guitar for Room Sound

Hey, everyone.

Mark Marshall with theproaudiofiles.com and
guitaristmarkmarshall.com.

Today, I want to talk about some less than
usual uses for a reamp box.

Now, when people hear about reamping, I think
their first impression is recording a DI guitar

part and later on, running it through guitar
amps, but it’s not the only use for it.

Of course, I’m still talking about using it
for guitar amps, but I’m using it in a situation

where I have, say, limited inputs.

For those of you out there that may have a
sound card with just two inputs on it, this

could present a problem, say, if you want
to put two mics on a guitar amp, or one mic

on a guitar amp and then a vocal, you’re out
of inputs.

So if you want to also include a room mic,
this would present a problem.

This is the exact scenario for me recently,
when I was making a mobile record.

I was using the UAD Apollo, and I only had
four inputs on it.

I was using all four inputs at the time, and
I knew that I wanted to get more of a roomy

sound for the guitar amp.

The guitar amp I had placed in a tile bathroom,
and I really liked the reflections, and I

knew I wanted to have a secondary mic on it.

When I record guitar tracks, I always take
a DI feed.

Most of the time, I’ll never touch that DI,
but every once in awhile, I might run it into

a secondary effect or a secondary amp, or
in this case, I want to cheat a little bit

and make it sound like I had multiple mics
on the guitar cab.

Let’s listen to the finished guitar sound.

[electric guitar plays]

For that particular sound, we used the Martin
D-28, and I ran the pickup out of it into

a Princeton amp that I had placed in the bathroom,
and the amp was probably on, like, eight.

It was really overdriving hard.

Let’s just listen to the room sound on this.

[room recording plays]

After I record the guitar track, I ran the
DI line out to this reamp box, and I moved

the mic around the room until I found a spot
that I really liked.

For this particular track, instead of the
microphone facing the amplifier, I had it

back maybe five feet, and I faced the mic
the opposite direction so it was going away

from the speakers.

I got a lot more room sound this way.

It was a fairly small bathroom, but it made
it sound a little bigger, and I got a little

bit more of those tile reflections, and a
little bit less of the direct sound of the

amplifier.

From there, I blended it with the original
signal, but you have to be careful, and you

have to still check all of your phase relationships.

I always will pull up a plug-in and flip the
phase shift to make sure that the phase relationships

are good.

It’s worth noting that I didn’t mess with
the guitar amp settings for this process.

I wanted to reflections in the room to be
the same, as it was when the guitar was plugged

into the amp.

If you want to get creative, you could maybe
run it through a different amp or change the

settings a little bit, or the gain structure.

You could also experiment with moving the
amp to a different room and getting those

reflections.

Say you wanted a bigger room sound, but for
the initial recording, you had to have it

in a little bit more of an isolated space.

You could then take that same amp and move
it to a bigger room and back the mic off.

Tips for Reamping Electric Guitar for Room Sound

http://theproaudiofiles.com // Tips for reamping guitar to get different room sounds.

Transcript:

Hey, everyone. Mark Marshall with theproaudiofiles.com and guitaristmarkmarshall.com.

Today, I want to talk about some less than usual uses for a reamp box. Now, when people hear about reamping, I think their first impression is recording a DI guitar part and later on, running it through guitar amps, but it’s not the only use for it.

Of course, I’m still talking about using it for guitar amps, but I’m using it in a situation where I have, say, limited inputs. For those of you out there that may have a sound card with just two inputs on it, this could present a problem, say, if you want to put two mics on a guitar amp, or one mic on a guitar amp and then a vocal, you’re out of inputs. So if you want to also include a room mic, this would present a problem.

This is the exact scenario for me recently, when I was making a mobile record. I was using the UAD Apollo, and I only had four inputs on it. I was using all four inputs at the time, and I knew that I wanted to get more of a roomy sound for the guitar amp.

The guitar amp I had placed in a tile bathroom, and I really liked the reflections, and I knew I wanted to have a secondary mic on it. When I record guitar tracks, I always take a DI feed. Most of the time, I’ll never touch that DI, but every once in awhile, I might run it into a secondary effect or a secondary amp, or in this case, I want to cheat a little bit and make it sound like I had multiple mics on the guitar cab.

Let’s listen to the finished guitar sound.

[electric guitar plays]

For that particular sound, we used the Martin D-28, and I ran the pickup out of it into a Princeton amp that I had placed in the bathroom, and the amp was probably on, like, eight. It was really overdriving hard.

Let’s just listen to the room sound on this.

[room recording plays]

After I record the guitar track, I ran the DI line out to this reamp box, and I moved the mic around the room until I found a spot that I really liked. For this particular track, instead of the microphone facing the amplifier, I had it back maybe five feet, and I faced the mic the opposite direction so it was going away from the speakers.

I got a lot more room sound this way. It was a fairly small bathroom, but it made it sound a little bigger, and I got a little bit more of those tile reflections, and a little bit less of the direct sound of the amplifier.
From there, I blended it with the original signal, but you have to be careful, and you have to still check all of your phase relationships. I always will pull up a plug-in and flip the phase shift to make sure that the phase relationships are good.

It’s worth noting that I didn’t mess with the guitar amp settings for this process. I wanted to reflections in the room to be the same, as it was when the guitar was plugged into the amp.

If you want to get creative, you could maybe run it through a different amp or change the settings a little bit, or the gain structure.
You could also experiment with moving the amp to a different room and getting those reflections. Say you wanted a bigger room sound, but for the initial recording, you had to have it in a little bit more of an isolated space. You could then take that same amp and move it to a bigger room and back the mic off.

About The Pro Audio Files

Tutorials on mixing, mastering and producing music in Pro Tools with plugins from Waves, FabFilter, SoundToys, Softube, Sonnox, PSP, Slate Digital and more. Learn how to mix using EQ, compression and effects like reverb, delay, saturation and distortion on vocals, drums, guitar, bass and more.

Tips for Reamping Electric Guitar for Room Sound

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