Getting a Studio Internship — Cover Letter (Part 1)

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Getting a Studio Internship — Cover Letter (Part 1)

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Getting a Studio Internship — Cover Letter (Part 1)

Instant access to every in-depth mixing course from Matthew Weiss: https://theproaudiofiles.com/members

http://mixing101.co // The first in a two-part series on getting a recording studio internship.

Transcript Excerpt:

Hey, folks. Matthew Weiss here — weiss-sound.com, theproaudiofiles.com/members and mixthru.co.

We’re going to do something a little different in this tutorial. We are going to be talking about getting internships.

Alright, so this first segment is going to be about sending a cover letter. Why do we send a cover letter and a resume? Well, there’s a lot of reasons, because of what they do, but ultimately, the reason why you want to send a cover letter and a resume is because that’s what you do when you’re applying for a professional position.

You see, the thing is being on the hiring side, I’ve learned that what I’m really looking for is somebody who actually takes it — truly takes it — seriously.

So when you send a cover letter, just the fact that you are actually sending a cover letter is already going to put you ahead of about 50% of the people who send in internship requests.

I know that sounds ridiculous, but it’s true! Half of the people who are applying are just simply not writing cover letters.

Now, I’m going to read you this cover letter that was sent to me a number of years back. It’s an example of a cover letter that I thought was very good. There’s a couple of tiny little things that maybe would be improved, but overall, this is certainly going to be something that will get me to do the next step, which is read the resume, and that’s really what the cover letter is for. It’s an informal advertisement of who you are and why you want the job that gets me to read your resume.

Alright, here we go. “Dear Mr. Weiss.”So number one, he’s addressing me by name and properly. He’s spelled my name properly, and he said Mr. Weiss. He’s addressing me in a professional way. Again, I know this sounds absolutely ridiculous, but I’d say about a third of the internship requests I’ve gotten over the years have not put my name down correctly.

Okay, “My name is [blank], and I am inquiring about interning with your organization, Weiss Sound this summer. I am looking for an internship to gain experience that I can not get in a classroom. After researching your website, I noticed that I am familiar with some of your clients, particularly Random.

“I have previously worked with Mr. Jarbo, producing one of his early MegaRan songs, so I am very excited to have the opportunity to work with an engineer who has credits with established artists, and thus has knowledge to share.”

Alright. So the very first thing that you want to do, at the top of your cover letter — and this is fantastic. This guy nailed it. Make it clear why you want to work with me personally.

Now, when I say me, I sort of mean the universal me. Whenever you’re applying to a particular studio, make it clear why you want to work at that studio. One thing that I guarantee you all of the hiring managers hate to see, is a generic cover letter that looks like it was just being sent out to every studio in town. That’s a very quick way to get your cover letter and resume trashed.

Alright, so this is great. He’s relating to me, he’s speaking to what he’s looking for, and why me in particular.

Alright, “I am currently a Broadcasting, Telecommunications, and Mass Media major at Temple University, specifically in the Recording Industry program, but my experience extends further than the school I attend. For eight years, I have experience recording, producing, and mixing music for independent artists and myself, with extensive knowledge of both digital and analog recording equipment. In addition to engineering knowledge, I am a hard worker and very eager to learn. One of my strengths is being able to adapt to new systems easily, and I am confident that I can be of help to you in a professional manner. In addition, I am easy to get along with, while still being a hard worker. I love being in a studio environment, and part of a team dedicated to music, and I believe this internship will be a great benefit to both of us.”

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About Pro Audio Files

Tutorials on mixing, mastering and producing music in Pro Tools with plugins from Waves, FabFilter, SoundToys, Softube, Sonnox, PSP, Slate Digital and more. Learn how to mix using EQ, compression and effects like reverb, delay, saturation and distortion on vocals, drums, guitar, bass and more.

Getting a Studio Internship — Cover Letter (Part 1)

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